Health,  Pregnancy,  Reproductive Health

Depo Provera or Birth Control Shot As A Contraceptive. How It Affects Your Body?

A Birth Control Shot is a contraceptive injection. It is a progestin-only, long-acting, reversible birth control drug. 

The name of the drug is Depo-Provera.

The shot is injected every three months at a doctor’s office, not just anywhere. It prevents pregnancy by stopping the woman from releasing an egg.

According to a study, it is 94% effective, and the chance of pregnancy increases as the shot wears off. That is why it is essential to remember to book another shoot after three months to ensure its effectiveness.

A woman should take note that it does not protect against STIs or sexually transmitted infections.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The controlled shot contains the hormone progestin. Progestin stops a woman from getting pregnant by preventing ovulation. When there’s no egg in the tube, pregnancy can’t happen. 

It also works by making cervical mucus thicker. When the mucus on the cervix is more viscous, the sperm can’t get through. And when the sperm and egg can’t get together, pregnancy can’t happen.

WHO SHOULDN’T GET THE DEPO-PROVERA OR BIRTH CONTROL SHOT?

Not all women can get this type of contraception. Women who have the following listed below should not get one.

  1. Unexplained vaginal bleeding
  2. Liver disease
  3. Breast cancer
  4. Blood clots

For teenagers, the doctor will be cautious about giving it to you if you have these:

  • Diabetes
  • History of depression
  • History of heart stroke or attack
  • Osteoporosis or a high risk of it

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF A BIRTH CONTROL SHOT?

  • Irregular menstrual periods or no periods at all
  • Headaches
  • Nervousness
  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • Acne
  • Changes in appetite
  • Weight gain
  • Unwanted facial and body hair
  • Hair loss
  • Loss of bone mineral density
  • Belly pain
  • Bloating
  • Breakthrough bleeding
  • Fatigue
  • Less interest in sex
  • Weakness

Changes to your menstrual cycle are the most common side effects. Bleeding or spotting is normal. But, after a year of use, about 50% of women will stop getting their periods. If this happens, your period should return when you stop getting the shots.

Long-term use of Depo-Provera or Birth Control Shot may lead to bone mineral density loss, making you more likely to get osteoporosis. Your chances are even higher if you have taken the shot for longer than two years, especially if osteoporosis runs in the family, you drink a lot, you smoke, or you have other risk factors.

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